Installing GT 4.2.1

Introduction

This guide is the starting point for everyone who wants to install Globus Toolkit 4.2.1. It will take you through a basic installation that installs Java WS Core and the following Base Services: a security infrastructure (GSI), GridFTP, Execution Services (GRAM), and Information Services (WS MDS).

This guide is also available as a PDF. However, each component includes online reference material, which this guide sometimes links to.


Table of Contents

1. Before you begin
2. Software Prerequisites
1. Required software
2. Optional software
3. Platform Notes
1. Apple MacOS X
2. Debian
3. Fedora Core
4. FreeBSD
5. HP/UX
6. IBM AIX
7. Red Hat
8. SGI Altix (IA64 running Red Hat)
9. Sun Solaris
10. SuSE Linux
11. Tru64 Unix
12. Windows
4. Installing GT 4.2.1
1. Basic Installation
2. Advanced Installation
2.1. Building from CVS
2.2. Building a specific package from source
2.3. Detailed installation instructions for these components
5. Basic Security Configuration
1. Set environment variables
2. Obtain host certificates
2.1. Request a certificate from an existing CA
2.2. SimpleCA
2.3. Low-trust certificate
3. Make the host credentials accessible by the container
4. Add authorization
5. Verify Basic Security
6. Firewall configuration
6. Basic Setup for GT 4.2.1
A. Packaging details
1. The makefile
2. The Grid Packaging Toolkit
3. Picking a flavor for a source installation
B. Environmental Variables in GT 4.2.1
1. Common Runtime Environmental Variables
1.1. Environmental variables for Java WS Core
1.2. Environmental variables for XIO
1.3. Environmental variables for C Common Libraries
2. Security Environmental Variables
2.1. Environmental Variables for GSI C
2.1.1. Credentials
2.1.2. Gridmap file
2.1.3. Trusted CAs directory
2.1.4. GSI authorization callout configuration file
2.1.5. GAA (Generic Authorization and Access control) configuration file
2.1.6. Grid security directory
2.1.7. Using TLS
2.1.8. Name Comparisons
2.2. Environmental variables for WS Authentication & Authorization (Java)
2.3. Environmental variables for the Delegation Service
2.4. Environmental variables for CAS
2.5. Environmental variables for MyProxy
2.6. Environmental variables for GSI-OpenSSH
3. Data Management Environmental Variables
3.1. Environment variables for GridFTP
3.2. Environmental variables for RFT
3.3. Environmental variables for Batch Replicator
4. Execution Management Environmental Variables
4.1. Environment variables for GridWay
C. Installing SimpleCA
1. Create users
2. Run the setup script
2.1. Configure the subject name
2.2. Configure the CA's email
2.3. Configure the expiration date
2.4. Enter a passphrase
2.5. Confirm generated certificate
2.6. Complete setup of GSI
3. Host certificates
3.1. 3.1 Request a host certificate
3.2. Sign the host certificate
4. User certificates
4.1. Request a user certificate
4.2. Sign the user certificate
5. Verify the SimpleCA certificate installation
6. Configure SimpleCA for multiple machines
D. Deploying in GT 4.2.1
1. Deploying into the Java WS Core container
1.1. Deploying and undeploying services
1.2. Recommended JVM settings for the Java WS Core container
2. Deploying into Tomcat
2.1. web.xml configuration
2.2. Debugging
2.2.1. Tomcat log files
2.2.2. Enabling Log4J debugging
2.3. Creating WAR file
2.4. Deploying and undeploying services
3. Deploying into JBoss
E. Troubleshooting your installation
F. Detailed Configuration by Component
G. Security Considerations in GT 4.2.1
1. Common Runtime
1.1. Java WS Core
1.1.1. Permissions of service configuration files
1.1.2. Permissions of persistent data
1.1.3. Invocation of non-public service functions
1.2. C WS Core
1.2.1. Supported Protocols
1.2.2. Secure Transport
1.3. Security Considerations for Python WS Core
1.3.1. Transport Security
1.4. Security considerations for XIO
1.5. Security considerations for CoG jGlobus
1.5.1. Functions that execute an external program
1.5.2. Permissions of proxy files
1.6. Security Considerations for PyGlobus
2. Security
2.1. Security considerations for GSI C
2.2. Security considerations for Java WS A&A
2.2.1. Security considerations for authorization
2.2.2. Security considerations for Message/Transport-level Security
2.3. Security Considerations for CAS
2.4. Delegation Service Security Considerations
2.4.1. Key Pair Reuse
2.4.2. Authorizing Server prior to delegation
2.5. MyProxy Security Considerations
2.6. GSI-OpenSSH Security Considerations
3. Data Management
3.1. Reliable Transfer Service (RFT) Security Considerations
3.1.1. Permissions of service configuration files
3.1.2. Access of information stored in the database
3.1.3. Permissions of persistent data
3.2. Security Considerations
3.2.1. Ways to configure your server
3.2.2. New authentication option
3.2.3. Firewall requirements
3.3. Replica Location Service (RLS) Security Considerations
3.4. WS Replica Location Service (WS RLS) Security Considerations
3.5. Batch Replicator Security Considerations
3.5.1. Service configuration files
3.5.2. Delegated proxy credential files
4. Information Services
4.1. WS MDS Aggregator Services (Index Service and Trigger Service) Security Considerations
4.2. WebMDS Security Considerations
4.3. UsefulRP Security Considerations
5. Execution Management
5.1. Security Considerations
H. Usage Statistics
1. Common Runtime Usage Statistics
1.1. Usage statistics sent by Java WS Core
1.2. Usage statistics sent by C WS Core
2. Data Management Usage Statistics
2.1. Usage statistics sent by RFT
2.2. GridFTP-specific usage statistics
2.3. RLS-specific usage statistics
2.4. WS RLS-specific usage statistics
3. Execution Management Usage Statistics
3.1. GRAM4-specific usage statistics
Glossary

Chapter 1. Before you begin

Before you start installing the Globus Toolkit 4.2.1, there are a few things you should consider. The toolkit contains many subcomponents, and you may only be interested in some of them.

There are non-web services implementations of:

  • Security (Non-WS Authentication and Authorization)
  • File Transfers GridFTP
  • Resource Management (GRAM2)
  • Replica Location Service
  • and Information Services (MDS2).
[Important]Important

These all run on Unix platforms only.

Additionally, there are WSRF implementations of:

  • Security (Delegation Service, ...?)
  • Resource Management (GRAM4)
  • Reliable File Transfer (RFT)
  • and Information Services (Index Service).
[Important]Important

All the Java clients to these services run on both Windows and Unix. The WSRF GRAM service requires infrastructure that only runs on Unix systems.

Therefore, if you are new to the toolkit and want to experiment with all of the components, you may want to use a Unix system. If you are interested in the Windows development, you may restrict yourself to the Java-based software.

Chapter 2. Software Prerequisites

1. Required software

  • Globus Toolkit installer, from Globus Toolkit download page

  • Make sure Java is installed: J2SE 1.5.0+ SDK from Sun, IBM, HP, or BEA (do not use GCJ).

  • Ant 1.6.2+. Do not use the Ant distributed with Fedora Core 2, or other recent RedHat/Fedora distributions (RHEL3, Scientific Linux 3.0.x, FC3/4).

  • C compiler. If gcc, avoid version 3.2. Versions 3.2.1 and 2.95.x are okay.

  • GNU tar

  • GNU sed

  • zlib 1.1.4+

  • GNU Make

  • sudo for basic GRAM4 functionality. For a more complete list of prerequisites, see Prerequisites for installing GRAM4.

  • Openssl 0.9.7 or later. For linux systems, this includes the -devel version of the package.

  • gpt-3.2autotools2004 (shipped with the installers, but required if building standalone GPT bundles/packages)

2. Optional software

  • IODBC (compile requirement for RLS) For a more complete list of RLS prerequisites, see Prerequisites for RLS.

    • A Relational Database Server (RDBMS) that supports ODBC (we provide instructions for both PostgreSQL and MySQL [olink to appendix]):

      • If you use PostgreSQL, you'll also need psqlODBC (the ODBC driver for PostgreSQL).
      • If you use MySQL, you'll also need the MyODBC (Connector/ODBC) packages. MySQL's top level installation directory must be specified. By default these are assumed to be in $GLOBUS_LOCATION.
    • The package is used to interface to the ODBC layer of the RDBMS. The location of iODBC and the odbc.ini file must be specified before installing the RLS server.
  • Tomcat (required by WebMDS, optional for other services) - Make sure to download it directly from the Apache web site.

  • gLite Java VOMS parsing libraries - binary available (compile requirement for Workspace Service)

Chapter 3. Platform Notes

In this section, the word "flavor" refers to a combination of compiler type (gcc or other), 32 or 64 bit libraries, and debugging enabled or not.

1. Apple MacOS X

MacOS binaries are provided. The Debian workaround is not needed anymore (see bug 5481). Solaris 9 may need some environment variables set to build with vendor-provided openssl (see http://dev.globus.org/wiki/C_Security:_Vendor_OpenSSL#Known_Issues_and_Workarounds)

2. Debian

Some kernel/libc combinations trigger a threading problem. See bug #2194. The workaround is to set LD_ASSUME_KERNEL=2.2.5 in your environment.

3. Fedora Core

Fedora Core 2 and later ship with a broken ant. Install your own ant from http://ant.apache.org and either remove the ant RPM or edit /etc/ant.conf, setting ANT_HOME to your own ant installation.

4. FreeBSD

No known issues.

5. HP/UX

4.2.1 has not been tested on HP-UX.

For HP-UX/IA64 and for additional details about GT4 on HP-UX/PA-RISC, please consult the HP GT4 support page.

6. IBM AIX

Supported flavors are vendorcc32dbg/vendorcc32 and vendorcc64dbg/vendorcc64 using the Visual Age compilers (xlc). No gcc flavors are supported. Specify a flavor using --with-flavor=flavor.

GNU sed, tar, and make are required before the IBM ones in the PATH.

The toolkit has been tested on AIX 5.2 with:

  • Visual Age C/C++ 6.0

  • 32 bit version of IBM Java 1.4

  • Apache Ant 1.5.4

7. Red Hat

RHEL5 has upgraded to openssl0.9.8. Our RHAS3/4 binaries are built using openssl0.9.7. You will either need to build from source on RHEL5+, or install the older RHEL4 openssl 0.9.7 RPMs.

When building from source on a Red Hat Enterprise line version 3 or 4 based OS, GPT might have a problem retrieving exit codes from subshells. You might see errors which says they were both successful and failed:

 BUILD SUCCESSFUL Total time: 11 seconds ERROR: Build has failed make: ***
            [globus_wsrf_servicegroup] Error 10

The workaround is to configure with --with-buildopts="-verbose"

8. SGI Altix (IA64 running Red Hat)

Some extra environment variables are required for building MPI flavors. For the Intel compiler:

 export CC=icc export CFLAGS=-no-gcc export CXX=icpc export CXXFLAGS=-no-gcc export
            LDFLAGS=-lmpi

For the GNU compiler:

 export CC=gcc export CXX=g++ export LDFLAGS=-lmpi

In both cases, configure with --with-flavor=mpicc64

9. Sun Solaris

Supported flavors are gcc32, gcc64, vendorcc32 and vendorcc64. The dbg flavors should work as well. For gcc64, a gcc built to target 64 bit object files is required. The gcc32dbg flavor will be used by default. Specify other flavors using --with-flavor=flavor.

For Solaris 10, you may need to use an updated GNU binutils, or the provided Sun /usr/ccs/bin/ld to link. See binutils bug 1031 for details on Solaris 10 symbol versioning errors.

GPT has problems with the Sun provided perl and tar: http://www.gridpackagingtools.org/book/latest-stable/ch01s07.html

The toolkit has been tested on Solaris 9 with:

  • Sun Workshop 6 update 2 C 5.3

  • gcc 3.4.3

  • Sun Java 1.4.2_02

  • Apache Ant 1.5.4

10. SuSE Linux

No known issues.

11. Tru64 Unix

Specify --with-flavor=vendorcc64 on the configure line. GNU tar, GNU sed, and GNU make are required on the PATH.

The toolkit has been tested on Tru64 UNIX (V5.1A and V5.1B) with:

  • HP C V6.4-009 and V6.5-003 compilers
  • Java 1.4.2_04
  • Apache Ant 1.6.2

For additional details about GT4 on Tru64 Unix, please consult the HP GT4 support page.

12. Windows

Only Java-only components will build. Please choose the Java WS Core-only download and follow the instructions in the Java WS Core Admin Guide.

Chapter 4. Installing GT 4.2.1

1. Basic Installation

  1. Create a user named "globus". This non-privileged user will be used to perform administrative tasks such as starting and stopping the container, deploying services, etc. Pick an installation directory, and make sure this account has read and write permissions in the installation directory.

    [Tip]Tip

    You might need to create the target directory as root, then chown it to the globus user:

    # mkdir /usr/local/globus-4.2.1.1
    # chown globus:globus /usr/local/globus-4.2.1.1

    [Important]Important

    If for some reason you do not create a user named "globus", be sure to run the installation as a non-root user. In that case, make sure to pick an install directory that your user account has write access to.

  2. Download the required software noted in Software Prerequisites for Installing GT.

    [Tip]Tip

    Be aware that Apache Ant will use the Java referred to by JAVA_HOME, not necessarily the first Java executable on your PATH. Be sure to set JAVA_HOME to the top-level directory of your Java installation before installing.

    Also, check the Platform Notes for GT if your OS includes ant already. Your /etc/ant.conf is probably configured to use gcj, which will fail to compile the Toolkit.

  3. In this guide we will assume that you are installing to /usr/local/globus-4.2.1.1, but you may replace /usr/local/globus-4.2.1.1 with whatever directory you wish to install to.

    As the globus user, run:

    globus$ export GLOBUS_LOCATION=/usr/local/globus-4.2.1.1
                        globus$ ./configure --prefix=$GLOBUS_LOCATION

    You can use command line arguments to ./configure for a more custom install. Here are the lines to enable features which are disabled by default:

    Optional Features:
    --enable-prewsmds       Build pre-webservices mds. Default is disabled.
    --enable-wsgram-condor  Build GRAM Condor scheduler interface. Default is disabled.
    --enable-wsgram-lsf     Build GRAM LSF scheduler interface. Default is disabled.
    --enable-wsgram-pbs     Build GRAM PBS scheduler interface. Default is disabled.
    --enable-i18n           Enable internationalization. Default is disabled.
    --enable-drs            Enable Data Replication Service. Default is disabled.
    [...]
    Optional Packages:
    [...]
    --with-iodbc=dir        Use the iodbc library in dir/lib/libiodbc.so.
    Required for RLS builds.
    --with-gsiopensshargs="args"
    Arguments to pass to the build of GSI-OpenSSH, like
    --with-tcp-wrappers

    For a full list of options, see ./configure --help. For a list of GSI-OpenSSH options, see Optional Build-Time Configuration for GSI-OpenSSH. For more information about our packaging or about choosing a flavor, see Packing Details for Installing GT.

  4. Run:

    globus$ make

    Note that this command can take several hours to complete. If you wish to have a log file of the build, use tee:

    globus$ make 2>&1 | tee build.log

    The syntax above assumes a Bourne shell. If you are using another shell, redirect stderr to stdout and then pipe it to tee.

    [Note]Note

    Using make in parallel mode (-j) is not entirely safe, and is not recommended.

  5. Finally, run:

    globus$ make install

    This completes your installation. Now you may move on to the configuration sections of the following chapters.

    We recommend that you install any security advisories available for your installation, which are available from the Advisories page. You may also be interested in subscribing to some mailing lists for general discussion and security-related announcements.

Your next step is to setup security, which includes picking a CA to trust, getting host certificates, user certificates, and creating a grid-mapfile. The next three chapters cover these topics.

With security setup, you may start a GridFTP server, configure a database for RFT, and configure WS-GRAM. You may also start a GSI-OpenSSH daemon, setup a MyProxy server, run RLS, and use CAS. The following chapters will explain how to configure these technologies. If you follow the chapters in order, you will make sure of performing tasks in dependency order.

2. Advanced Installation

2.1. Building from CVS

[For advanced developers: general instructions for building from CVS and then list of branches? just olink to existing page...]

2.2. Building a specific package from source

[For advanced developers: general instructions for building from source then table with list of packages?]

2.3. Detailed installation instructions for these components

The following is a list of links to more detailed installation information available for the following components:

Chapter 5. Basic Security Configuration

1. Set environment variables

In order for the system to know the location of the Globus Toolkit commands you just installed, you must set an environment variable and source the globus-user-env.sh script.

  1. As globus, set GLOBUS_LOCATION to where you installed the Globus Toolkit. This will be one of the following:

    • Using Bourne shells:

      globus$ export GLOBUS_LOCATION=/path/to/install
    • Using csh:

      globus$ setenv GLOBUS_LOCATION /path/to/install
  2. Source $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user-env.{sh,csh} depending on your shell.

    • Use .sh for Bourne shell:

      globus$ . $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user-env.sh
    • Use .csh for C shell.

      globus$ source $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user-env.csh

2. Obtain host certificates

You must have X509 certificates to use the GT 4.2.1 software securely (referred to in this documentation as host certificates). For an overview of certificates for GSI (security) see GSI Configuration Information and GSI Environmental Variables.

Host certificates must:

  • consist of the following two files: hostcert.pem and hostkey.pem
  • be in the appropriate directory for secure services: /etc/grid-security/
  • be for a machine which has a consistent name in DNS; you should not run it on a computer using DHCP where a different name could be assigned to your computer.

You have the following options:

2.1.  Request a certificate from an existing CA

Your best option is to use an already existing CA. You may have access to one from the company you work for or an organization you are affiliated with. Some universities provide certificates for their members and affiliates. Contact your support organization for details about how to acquire a certificate. You may find your CA listed in the TERENA Repository.

If you already have a CA, you will need to follow their configuration directions. If they include a CA setup package, follow the CAs instruction on how to install the setup package. If they do not, you will need to create an /etc/grid-security/certificates directory and include the CA cert and signing policy in that directory. See Configuring a Trusted CA for more details.

This type of certificate is best for service deployment and Grid inter-operation.

2.2. SimpleCA

SimpleCA provides a wrapper around the OpenSSL CA functionality and is sufficient for simple Grid services. Alternatively, you can use OpenSSL's CA.sh command on its own. Instructions on how to use the SimpleCA can be found in Installing SimpleCA.

SimpleCA is suitable for testing or when a certificate authority is not available.

2.3. Low-trust certificate

Globus offers a low-trust certificate available at http://gcs.globus.org:8080/gcs. This option should only be used as a last resort because it does not fulfill some of the duties of a real Certificate Authority.

This type of certificate is best suited for short term testing.

3. Make the host credentials accessible by the container

The host key (/etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem) is only readable to root. The container (hosting environment provided by Java WS Core) will be running as a non-root user (probably the globus user) and in order to have a set of host credentials which are readable by the container, we need to copy the host certificate and key and change the ownership to the container user.

[Note]Note

This step assumes you have obtained a signed host certificate from your CA.

As root, run:

root# cd /etc/grid-security
root# cp hostkey.pem containerkey.pem
root# cp hostcert.pem containercert.pem
root# chown globus.globus containerkey.pem containercert.pem

At this point the certificates in /etc/grid-security should look something like:

root# ls -l *.pem
-rw-r--r-- 1 globus globus 1785 Oct 14 14:47 containercert.pem
-r-------- 1 globus globus  887 Oct 14 14:47 containerkey.pem
-rw-r--r-- 1 root   root   1785 Oct 14 14:42 hostcert.pem
-r-------- 1 root   root    887 Sep 29 09:59 hostkey.pem

4. Add authorization

Add authorizations for users:

Create /etc/grid-security/grid-mapfile as root.

You need two pieces of information:

  • the subject name of a user
  • the account name it should map to.

The syntax is one line per user, with the certificate subject followed by the user account name.

Run grid-cert-info to get your subject name, and whoami to get the account name:

bacon$ grid-cert-info -subject
/O=Grid/OU=GlobusTest/OU=simpleCA-mayed.mcs.anl.gov/OU=mcs.anl.gov/CN=Charles Bacon
bacon$ whoami
bacon

You may add the line by running the following as root:

root# $GLOBUS_LOCATION/sbin/grid-mapfile-add-entry -dn \
"/O=Grid/OU=GlobusTest/OU=simpleCA-mayed.mcs.anl.gov/OU=mcs.anl.gov/CN=Charles Bacon" \
-ln bacon

The corresponding line in the grid-mapfile should look like:

"/O=Grid/OU=GlobusTest/OU=simpleCA-mayed.mcs.anl.gov/OU=mcs.anl.gov/CN=Charles Bacon" bacon
[Important]Important

The quotes around the subject name are important, because it contains spaces.

5. Verify Basic Security

Now that you have installed a trusted CA, acquired a hostcert and acquired a usercert, you may verify that your security setup is complete. As your user account, run the following command:

bacon$ grid-proxy-init -verify -debug

User Cert File: /home/bacon/.globus/usercert.pem
User Key File: /home/bacon/.globus/userkey.pem

Trusted CA Cert Dir: /etc/grid-security/certificates

Output File: /tmp/x509up_u506
Your identity: /DC=org/DC=doegrids/OU=People/CN=Charles Bacon 332900
Enter GRID pass phrase for this identity:
Creating proxy ...++++++++++++
..................++++++++++++
 Done
Proxy Verify OK
Your proxy is valid until: Fri Jan 28 23:13:22 2005

There are a few things you can notice from this command. Your usercert and key are located in $HOME/.globus/. The proxy certificate is created in /tmp/. The "up" stands for "user proxy", and the _u506 will be your UNIX userid. It also prints out your distinguished name (DN), and the proxy is valid for 12 hours.

If this command succeeds, your single node is correctly configured.

6. Firewall configuration

For information on configuring services in the presence of a firewall, see the firewall PDF.

Chapter 6. Basic Setup for GT 4.2.1

The Quickstart Guide walks you through setting up basic services on multiple machines.

Appendix A. Packaging details

1. The makefile

You do not have to build every subcomponent of this release. The makefile specifies subtargets for different functional subpieces.

Makefile targets

  • i18n: Internationalization libraries
  • prewsgram: Pre-webservices GRAM
  • gridftp: GridFTP
  • prewsmds: OpenLDAP-based MDS2
  • prews: GRAM2, MDS2, and GridFTP
  • wsjava: Java WS Core
  • wsc: C WS core
  • wsmds: WS MDS
  • wsdel: Delegation Service
  • wsrft: Reliable File Transfer service
  • wsgram: GRAM4
  • wscas: Community Authorization Service
  • wstests: Tests for java webservices
  • wsctests: Tests for C webservices
  • prews-test: Tests for pre-webservices components
  • rls: Replica Location Service

Note that all of these targets require the "install" target also. So, for instance, to build GridFTP alone, you would run:

$ ./configure --prefix=/path/to/install
$ make gridftp install

2. The Grid Packaging Toolkit

The Globus Toolkit is packaged using the Grid Packaging Toolkit (GPT). The GPT provides a way for us to version packages and express dependencies between packages. The Makefile for the installer is automatically generated based on the GPT dependencies expressed in CVS. GPT versions also allow us to release update packages for small subsets of our code. For more information on the GPT, you may see its website.

3. Picking a flavor for a source installation

If you're building on a platform that is not auto-detected by the configure script, you will be prompted to specify a flavor for the --with-flavor= option. Typically "gcc32dbg" will work as a flavor to build 32-bit binaries using gcc. If you want to force a 64bit build, "gcc64dbg" should work.

Some platforms have better support from their native compilers, so you can use "vendorcc32dbg" to build using the native cc. Similarly, "vendorcc64dbg" will force a 64bit build instead.

Appendix B. Environmental Variables in GT 4.2.1

1. Common Runtime Environmental Variables

1.1. Environmental variables for Java WS Core

Table B.1. Globus standard environment variables

Name Value Description Comments
GLOBUS_LOCATION<path>The <path> is the root location of the Java WS Core installation. Must be an absolute path. Required
GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE<min,max>The <min,max> is the minimum and maximum port range for TCP server sockets (useful for systems behind firewalls). For example, if set, the notification sink on the client will be started within that port range. Optional
GLOBUS_TCP_SOURCE_PORT_RANGE<min,max>The <min,max> is the minimum and maximum port range for TCP outgoing sockets (useful for systems behind firewalls). Optional
GLOBUS_UDP_SOURCE_PORT_RANGE<min,max>The <min,max> is the minimum and maximum port range for UDP outgoing sockets (useful for systems behind firewalls). Optional
GLOBUS_HOSTNAME<host>The <host> is either a hostname or ip address. The host ip address under which the container and services will be exposed. Optional

Table B.2. Launch script specific environment variables

Name Value Description Comments
GLOBUS_OPTIONS<arguments> The <arguments> are arbitrary arguments that can be passed to the JVM. See below for a detailed list of supported options.Optional
JAVA_HOME<path>The <path> is the root location of the JVM installation. If set, the JVM from that installation will be used. Otherwise, the first one found in path will be used. Optional
CLASSPATH<classpath>This environment property is ignored by launch scripts. Ignored

Table B.3. Options supported by the GLOBUS_OPTIONS environment property

Name Value Description
-Dorg.globus.wsrf.proxy.portintThis property specifies the port number of the proxy server. The proxy server must run on the same machine as the container. This setting will cause the service address to have the port of the proxy instead of the container (only applies to code that uses the ServiceHost or AddressingUtils API.
-Dorg.globus.wsrf.container.server.idstringThis property specifies the server id. The server id is used to uniquely identify each container instance. For example, each container gets its own persistent directory based on the server id. By default the standalone container will store the persistent resources under the ~/.globus/persisted/<ip>-<containerPort> directory. While in Tomcat the ~/.globus/persisted/<ip>-<webApplicationName> directory will be used instead. This property overwrites the default server id and therefore indirectly controls which storage directory is used by the container. If set, the container will store the persisted resources under ~/.globus/persisted/<server.id>/ instead. Note, that if somehow multiple containers running as the same user on the same machine end up with the same server id / persistent directory they might overwrite each other's persistent data.
-Dorg.globus.wsrf.container.persistence.dirdirectoryThis property specifies the base directory that will be used for storing the persistent resources. This property overwrites the default (~/.globus/persisted/) base directory assumed by the container.

Any JVM options can also be passed using the GLOBUS_OPTIONS environment property.

1.2. Environmental variables for XIO

The vast majority of the environment variables that effect the Globus XIO framework are defined by the driver in use. The following are links to descriptions of the more common driver environment variables:

1.3. Environmental variables for C Common Libraries

  • GLOBUS_ERROR_VERBOSE=1 can be set to enable verbose error messages.
  • GLOBUS_ERROR_OUTPUT=1 can be set to enable output of all errors (including some that should be ignored).

2. Security Environmental Variables

2.1. Environmental Variables for GSI C

2.1.1. Credentials

Credentials are looked for in the following order:

  1. service credential

  2. host credential

  3. proxy credential

  4. user credential

X509_USER_PROXY specifies the path to the proxy credential. If X509_USER_PROXY is not set, the proxy credential is created (by grid-proxy-init) and searched for (by client programs) in an operating-system-dependent local temporary file.

X509_USER_CERT and X509_USER_KEY specify the path to the end entity (user, service, or host) certificate and corresponding private key. The paths to the certificate and key files are determined as follows:

For service credentials:

  1. If X509_USER_CERT and X509_USER_KEY exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  2. Otherwise, if the files /etc/grid-security/service/servicecert and /etc/grid-security/service/servicekey exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  3. Otherwise, if the files $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/grid-security/service/servicecert and $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/grid-security/service/servicekey exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  4. Otherwise, if the files service/servicecert and service/servicekey in the user's .globus directory exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.

For host credentials:

  1. If X509_USER_CERT and X509_USER_KEY exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  2. Otherwise, if the files /etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem and /etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  3. Otherwise, if the files $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem and $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  4. Otherwise, if the files hostcert.pem and hostkey.pem in the user's .globus directory, exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.

For user credentials:

  1. If X509_USER_CERT and X509_USER_KEY exist and contain a valid certificate and key, those files are used.
  2. Otherwise, if the files usercert.pem and userkey.pem exist in the user's .globus directory, those files are used.
  3. Otherwise, if a PKCS-12 file called usercred.p12 exists in the user's .globus directory, the certificate and key are read from that file.

2.1.2. Gridmap file

GRIDMAP specifies the path to the grid map file, which is used to map distinguished names (found in certificates) to local names (such as login accounts). The location of the grid map file is determined as follows:

  1. If the GRIDMAP environment variable is set, the grid map file location is the value of that environment variable.
  2. Otherwise:

    • If the user is root (uid 0), then the grid map file is /etc/grid-security/grid-mapfile.
    • Otherwise, the grid map file is $HOME/.gridmap.

2.1.3. Trusted CAs directory

X509_CERT_DIR is used to specify the path to the trusted certificates directory. This directory contains information about which CAs are trusted (including the CA certificates themselves) and, in some cases, configuration information used by grid-cert-request to formulate certificate requests. The location of the trusted certificates directory is determined as follows:

  1. If the X509_CERT_DIR environment variable is set, the trusted certificates directory is the value of that environment variable.
  2. Otherwise, if $HOME/.globus/certificates exists, that directory is the trusted certificates directory.
  3. Otherwise, if /etc/grid-security/certificates exists, that directory is the trusted certificates directory.
  4. Finally, if $GLOBUS_LOCATION/share/certificates exists, then it is the trusted certificates directory.

2.1.4. GSI authorization callout configuration file

GSI_AUTHZ_CONF is used to specify the path to the GSI authorization callout configuration file. This file is used to configure authorization callouts used by both the gridmap and the authorization API. The location of the GSI authorization callout configuration file is determined as follows:

  1. If the GSI_AUTHZ_CONF environment variable is set, the authorization callout configuration file location is the value of this environment variable.
  2. Otherwise, if /etc/grid-security/gsi-authz.conf exists, then this file is used.
  3. Otherwise, if $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/gsi-authz.conf exists, then this file is used.
  4. Finally, if $HOME/.gsi-authz.conf exists, then this file is used.

2.1.5. GAA (Generic Authorization and Access control) configuration file

GSI_GAA_CONF is used to specify the path to the GSI GAA (Generic Authorization and Access control) configuration file. This file is used to configure policy language specific plugins to the GAA-API. The location of the GSI GAA configuration file is determined as follows:

  1. If the GSI_GAA_CONF environment variable is set, the GAA configuration file location is the value of this environment variable.
  2. Otherwise, if /etc/grid-security/gsi-gaa.conf exists, then this file is used.
  3. Otherwise, if $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/gsi-gaa.conf exists, then this file is used.
  4. Finally, if $HOME/.gsi-gaa.conf exists, then this file is used.

2.1.6. Grid security directory

GRID_SECURITY_DIR specifies a path to a directory containing configuration files that specify default values to be placed in certificate requests. This environment variable is used only by the grid-cert-request and grid-default-ca commands.

The location of the grid security directory is determined as follows:

  1. If the GRID_SECURITY_DIR environment variable is set, the grid security directory is the value of that environment variable.
  2. If the configuration files exist in /etc/grid-security, the grid security directory is that directory.
  3. if the configuration files exist in $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc, the grid security directory is that directory.

2.1.7. Using TLS

GLOBUS_GSSAPI_FORCE_TLS specifies whether to use TLS by default when establishing a security context. The default behavior if this is not set is to use SSLv3.

2.1.8. Name Comparisons

GLOBUS_GSSAPI_NAME_COMPATIBILITY specifies what name matching algorithms are supported by GSSAPI for mutual authentication and gss_compare_name. This variable may be set to any of the following values:

STRICT_GT2

Strictly backward-compatible with GT 2.0 name matching. X.509 subjectAltName values are ignored. Names with hyphens are treated as wildcarded as described in the security considerations documentation. Name matching will rely on canonical host name associated with connection IP addresses.

STRICT_RFC2818

Support RFC 2818 server identity processing. Hyphen characters are treated as normal part of a host name. DNSName and IPAddress subjectAltName extensions are matched against the host and port passed to GSSAPI. If subjectAltName is present, X.509 SubjectName is ignored.

HYBRID

Support a hybrid of the two previous name matching algorithms, liberally matching both hyphen wildcards, canonical names associated with IP addresses, and subjectAltName extensions.

If this variable is not set, the HYBRID behavior is used.

2.2. Environmental variables for WS Authentication & Authorization (Java)

Refer to Chapter 2, Configuring for environment variables. Note that the above environment variables do not supersede any settings provided in security descriptors.

2.3. Environmental variables for the Delegation Service

Refer to the environment variable interface for details.

The environment variables described above only affect the selection of credentials if no credentials are specified in any of the applicable security descriptors.

2.4. Environmental variables for CAS

All CAS client programs use the following environment variables to determine the appropriate URL to connect to and server identity to expect. In all cases, the command line options takes precedence over the environment variables.

  • The URL is determined using this algorithm:

    • If the -c command line option was specified, the URL specified with that option is used.
    • Otherwise, the CAS_SERVER_URL environment variable must be set, and its value is used.
  • The server identity (i.e. the expected subject name of the CAS server certificate) is determined as follows:

    • If the -s command line option was specified, the value specified with that option is used as the identity
    • Otherwise, if the CAS_SERVER_IDENTITY environment variable is set, the value of that variable is used as the expected server identity. Ensure that the value is enclosed within double quotes if there are spaces in the DN. The double quotes are required by the CAS scripts when they are run from a Windows shell, although the shell does not require it even if the value has spaces.
    • If neither is set, host authorization is done and the expected server credential is cas/<fqdn>, where <fqdn> is the fully qualified domain name of the host on which the CAS service is up.

2.5. Environmental variables for MyProxy

Table B.4. Environment variables

MYPROXY_SERVER Specifies the hostname where the myproxy-server is running. This environment variable can be used in place of the -s option.
MYPROXY_SERVER_PORT Specifies the port where the myproxy-server is running. This environment variable can be used in place of the -p option.
MYPROXY_SERVER_DN Specifies the distinguished name (DN) of the myproxy-server. All MyProxy client programs authenticate the server's identity. By default, MyProxy servers run with host credentials, so the MyProxy client programs expect the server to have a distinguished name of the form "host/<fqhn>" or "myproxy/<fqhn>" (where <fqhn> is the fully-qualified hostname of the server). If the server is running with some other DN, you can set this environment variable to tell the MyProxy clients to accept the alternative DN.
X509_USER_CERT Specifies a non-standard location for the certificate from which the proxy credential is created by myproxy-init. It also specifies an alternative location for the server's certificate. By default, the server uses /etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem when running as root or ~/.globus/usercert.pem when running as non-root.
X509_USER_KEY Specifies a non-standard location for the private key from which the proxy credential is created by myproxy-init. It also specifies an alternative location for the server's private key. By default the server uses /etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem when running as root or ~/.globus/userkey.pem when running as non-root.
X509_USER_PROXY Specifies an alternative location for the server's certificate and private key (in the same file). Use when running the server with a proxy credential. Note that the proxy will need to be periodically renewed before expiration to allow the myproxy-server to keep functioning. When the myproxy-server runs with a non-host credential, clients must have the MYPROXY_SERVER_DN environment variable set to the distinguished name of the certificate being used by the server.
GLOBUS_LOCATION Specifies the root of the MyProxy installation, used to find the default location of the myproxy-server.config file and the credential storage directory.
LD_LIBRARY_PATH The MyProxy server is typically linked dynamically with Globus security libraries, which must be present in the dynamic linker's search path. This typically requires $GLOBUS_LOCATION/lib to be included in the list in the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable, which is set by the $GLOBUS_LOCATION/libexec/globus-script-initializer script, which should be called from any myproxy-server startup script. Alternatively, to set LD_LIBRARY_PATH appropriately for the Globus libraries in an interactive shell, source $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user-env.sh (for sh shells) or $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user.env.csh (for csh shells).
GT_PROXY_MODE Set to "old" to use the "legacy globus proxy" format. By default, MyProxy uses the RFC 3820 compliant proxy (also known as "proxy draft compliant") format. If GT_PROXY_MODE is set to "old", then myproxy-init will store a legacy proxy and myproxy-logon will retrieve a legacy proxy (if possible). Note that if the repository contains a proxy certificate, rather than an end-entity certificate, the retrieved proxy will be of the same type as the stored proxy, regardless of the setting of this environment variable.

2.6. Environmental variables for GSI-OpenSSH

The GSI-enabled OpenSSHD needs to be able to find certain files and directories in order to properly function.

The items that OpenSSHD needs to be able to locate, their default location and the environment variable to override the default location are:

  • Host key

    Default location: /etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem

    Override with X509_USER_KEY environment variable

  • Host certificate

    Default location: /etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem

    Override with X509_USER_CERT environment variable

  • Grid map file

    Default location: /etc/grid-security/grid-mapfile

    Override with GRIDMAP environment variable

  • Certificate directory

    Default location: /etc/grid-security/certificates

    Override with X509_CERT_DIR environment variable

3. Data Management Environmental Variables

3.1. Environment variables for GridFTP

The GridFTP server or client libraries do not read any environment variable directly, but the security and networking related variables described below may be useful.

3.2. Environmental variables for RFT

The only environment variable that needs to be set for RFT is GLOBUS_LOCATION, in order to run the command line clients, which should be set to the location of the globus installation.

3.3. Environmental variables for Batch Replicator

  • GLOBUS_LOCATION=/path/to/globus/install

4. Execution Management Environmental Variables

4.1. Environment variables for GridWay

[Important]Important

You should include the following environment variables in your shell configuration file. (example $HOME/.bashrc)

In order to set the user environment, follow these steps:

  1. Set up Globus user environment:

    $ source $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user-env.sh

    or

    $ . $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-user-env.csh

    depending on the shell you are using.

  2. Set up the GridWay user environment:

    	$ export GW_LOCATION=<path_to_GridWay_installation>
    	$ export PATH=$PATH:$GW_LOCATION/bin

    or

    	$ setenv GW_LOCATION <path_to_GW_location>
    	$ setenv PATH $PATH:$GW_LOCATION/bin

    depending on the shell you are using.

  3. Optionally, you can set up your environment to use the GridWay DRMAA library:

    	$ export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:$GW_LOCATION/lib

    or:

    	$ setenv LD_LIBRARY_PATH $LD_LIBRARY_PATH:$GW_LOCATION/lib

  4. If GridWay has been compiled with accounting support, you may need to set up the DB library. For example, if DB library has been installed in /usr/local/BerkeleyDB.4.4:

    $ export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:/usr/local/BerkeleyDB.4.4/lib

    [Note]Note

    This step is only needed if your environment has not been configured, ask your administrator.

  5. DRMAA extensions for all the languages use the dynamic drmaa libraries provided by GridWay. To use this libraries it is needed to tell the operating system where to look for them. Here are described the steps needed to do this in Linux and MacOS X.

    • 1. In linux we have two ways to do this, one is using environment variables and the other one is modifying systemwide library path configuration. You only need to use one of this methods. If you do not have root access to the machine you are using or you do not want to setup it for every user in your system you have to use the environment variable method.

      • 1.1 The environment variable you have to set so the extensions find the required DRMAA library is LD_LIBRARY_PATH with a line similar to:

        export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$GW_LOCATION/lib

        If you want to setup this systemwide you can put this line alongside GW_LOCATION setup into /etc/profile. If you do not have root access or you want to do it per user the best place to do it is in the user's .bashrc.

        You can also do this steps in the console before launching your scripts as it will have the same effect.

      • Systems that use GNU/libc (GNU/Linux is one of them) do have a systemwide configuration file with the paths where to look for dynamic libraries. You have to add this line to /etc/ld.so.conf:

        <path_to_gridway_installation>/lib

        After doing this you have to rebuild the library cache issuing this command:

        # ldconfig
    • In MacOS X you have to use the environment variable method described for Linux but this time the name of the variable is DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Appendix C. Installing SimpleCA

The following are instructions for how to use SimpleCA to set up certificates for a GT 4.2.1 installation.

SimpleCA provides a wrapper around the OpenSSL CA functionality and is sufficient for simple Grid services. Alternatively, you can use OpenSSL's CA.sh command on its own. SimpleCA is suitable for testing or when a certificate authority (CA) is not available. You can find other CA options in Obtaining host certificates.

1. Create users

Make sure you have the following users on your machine:

  • Your user account, which will be used to run the client programs.
  • A generic globus account, which will be used to perform administrative tasks such as starting and stopping the container, deploying services, etc. This user will also be in charge of managing the SimpleCA. To do this, make sure this account has read and write permissions in the $GLOBUS_LOCATION directory.

2. Run the setup script

A script was installed to set up a new SimpleCA. You only need to run this script once per Grid.

Run the setup script:

$GLOBUS_LOCATION/setup/globus/setup-simple-ca 
		

2.1. Configure the subject name

This script prompts you for information about the CA you wish to create:

The unique subject name for this CA is:
cn=Globus Simple CA, ou=simpleCA-mayed.mcs.anl.gov, ou=GlobusTest, o=Grid

Do you want to keep this as the CA subject (y/n) [y]:

where:

Table C.1. CA Name components

cnRepresents "common name". Identifies this particular certificate as the CA certificate within the "GlobusTest/simpleCA-hostname" domain, which in this case is Globus Simple CA.
ouRepresents "organizational unit". Identifies this CA from other CAs created by SimpleCA by other people. The second "ou" is specific to your hostname (in this cases GlobusTest).
oRepresents "organization". Identifies the Grid.

Press y to keep the default subject name (recommended).

2.2. Configure the CA's email

The next prompt looks like:

Enter the email of the CA (this is the email where certificate
requests will be sent to be signed by the CA):

Enter the email address where you intend to receive certificate requests. It should be your real email address that you check, not the address of the globus user.

2.3. Configure the expiration date

Then you'll see:

The CA certificate has an expiration date. Keep in mind that 
once the CA certificate has expired, all the certificates 
signed by that CA become invalid.  A CA should regenerate 
the CA certificate and start re-issuing ca-setup packages 
before the actual CA certificate expires.  This can be done 
by re-running this setup script.  Enter the number of DAYS 
the CA certificate should last before it expires.
[default: 5 years (1825 days)]:

This is the number of days for which the CA certificate is valid. Once this time expires, the CA certificate will have to be recreated, and all of its certificates regranted.

Accept the default (recommended).

2.4. Enter a passphrase

Next you'll see:

Generating a 1024 bit RSA private key
........++++++
................++++++
writing new private key to '/home/globus/.globus/simpleCA//private/cakey.pem'
Enter PEM pass phrase:

The passphrase of the CA certificate will be used only when signing certificates (with grid-cert-sign). It should be hard to guess, as its compromise may compromise all the certificates signed by the CA.

Enter your passphrase.

[Important]Important:

Your passphrase must not contain any spaces.

2.5. Confirm generated certificate

Finally you'll see the following:

A self-signed certificate has been generated 
for the Certificate Authority with the subject: 

/O=Grid/OU=GlobusTest/OU=simpleCA-mayed.mcs.anl.gov/CN=Globus Simple CA

If this is invalid, rerun this script 

setup/globus/setup-simple-ca

and enter the appropriate fields.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

The private key of the CA is stored in /home/globus/.globus/simpleCA//private/cak ey.pem
The public CA certificate is stored in /home/globus/.globus/simpleCA//cacert.pem

The distribution package built for this CA is stored in

/home/globus/.globus/simpleCA//globus_simple_ca_68ea3306_setup-0.17.tar.gz

This information will be important for setting up other machines in your grid. The number 68ea3306 in the last line is known as your CA hash. It will be an 8 hexadecimal digit string.

Press any key to acknowledge this screen.

Your CA setup package finishes installing and ends the procedure with the following reminder:

***************************************************************************

Note: To complete setup of the GSI software you need to run the
following script as root to configure your security configuration
directory:

/opt/gt4/setup/globus_simple_ca_68ea3306_setup/setup-gsi

For further information on using the setup-gsi script, use the -help
option.  The -default option sets this security configuration to be 
the default, and -nonroot can be used on systems where root access is 
not available.

***************************************************************************

setup-ssl-utils: Complete
			

We'll run the setup-gsi script in the next section. For now, just notice that it refers to your $GLOBUS_LOCATION and the CA Hash from the last message.

2.6. Complete setup of GSI

To finish the setup of GSI, we'll run the script noted in the previous step.

Run the following as root (or, if no root privileges are available, add the -nonroot option to the command line):

$GLOBUS_LOCATION/setup/globus_simple_ca_CA_Hash_setup/setup-gsi -default

The output should look like:

setup-gsi: Configuring GSI security
Installing /etc/grid-security/certificates//grid-security.conf.CA_Hash...
Running grid-security-config...
Installing Globus CA certificate into trusted CA certificate directory...
Installing Globus CA signing policy into trusted CA certificate directory...
setup-gsi: Complete

3. Host certificates

You must request and sign a host certificate and then copy it into the appropriate directory for secure services. The certificate must be for a machine which has a consistent name in DNS; you should not run it on a computer using DHCP where a different name could be assigned to your computer.

3.1. 3.1 Request a host certificate

As root, run:

grid-cert-request -host 'hostname'

This creates the following files:

  • /etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem
  • /etc/grid-security/hostcert_request.pem
  • (an empty) /etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem

Note: If you are using your own CA, follow their instructions about creating a hostcert (one which has a commonName (CN) of your hostname), then place the cert and key in the /etc/grid-security/ location. You may then proceed to User certificates.

3.2. Sign the host certificate

  1. As globus, run:

    grid-ca-sign -in /etc/grid-security/hostcert_request.pem -out hostsigned.pem

  2. A signed host certificate, named hostsigned.pem is written to the current directory.
  3. When prompted for a passphrase, enter the one you specified in Enter a passphrase (for the private key of the CA certificate.)
  4. As root, move the signed host certificate to /etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem.

The certificate should be owned by root, and read-only for other users.

The key should be read-only by root.

4. User certificates

Users also must request user certificates, which you will sign using the globus user.

4.1. Request a user certificate

As your normal user account (not globus), run:

grid-cert-request

After you enter a passphrase, this creates

  • ~$USER/.globus/usercert.pem (empty)
  • ~$USER/.globus/userkey.pem
  • ~$USER/.globus/usercert_request.pem

Email the usercert_request.pem file to the SimpleCA maintainer.

4.2. Sign the user certificate

  1. As the SimpleCA owner globus, run:

    grid-ca-sign -in usercert_request.pem -out signed.pem

  2. When prompted for a password, enter the one you specified in Enter a passphrase (for the private key of the CA certificate).
  3. Now send the signed copy (signed.pem) back to the user who requested the certificate.
  4. As your normal user account (not globus), copy the signed user certificate into ~/.globus/ and rename it as usercert.pem, thus replacing the empty file.

The certificate should be owned by the user, and read-only for other users.

The key should be read-only by the owner.

5. Verify the SimpleCA certificate installation

To verify that the SimpleCA certificate is installed in /etc/grid-security/certificates and that your certificate is in place with the correct permissions, run:

user$ grid-proxy-init -debug -verify

After entering your passphrase, successful output will look like:

[bacon@mayed schedulers]$ grid-proxy-init -debug -verify

User Cert File: /home/user/.globus/usercert.pem
User Key File: /home/user/.globus/userkey.pem

Trusted CA Cert Dir: /etc/grid-security/certificates

Output File: /tmp/x509up_u1817
Your identity: /O=Grid/OU=GlobusTest/OU=simpleCA-mayed.mcs.anl.gov/OU=mcs.anl.gov/CN=User Name
Enter GRID pass phrase for this identity:
Creating proxy ..............................++++++++++++
...............++++++++++++
Done
Proxy Verify OK
Your proxy is valid until: Sat Mar 20 03:01:46 2004

6. Configure SimpleCA for multiple machines

So far, you have a single machine configured with SimpleCA certificates. Recall that in Complete setup of GSI a CA setup package was created in .globus/simpleCA/globus_simple_ca_HASH_setup-0.17.tar.gz. If you want to use your certificates on another machine, you must install that CA setup package on that machine.

To install it, copy that package to the second machine and run:

 $GLOBUS_LOCATION/sbin/gpt-build globus_simple_ca_HASH_setup-0.17.tar.gz gcc32dbg

Then you will have to perform setup-gsi -default from Sign the host certificate.

If you are going to run services on the second host, it will need its own Host certificates for SimpleCA and grid-mapfile (as described in the basic configuration instructions in Section 4, “Add authorization”).

You may re-use your user certificates on the new host. You will need to copy the requests to the host where the SimpleCA was first installed in order to sign them.

Appendix D. Deploying in GT 4.2.1

The Globus services can be run either in the standalone Java WS Core container that is installed with GT, or deployed into Tomcat.

1. Deploying into the Java WS Core container

The standalone Java WS Core container can be started and stopped with the provided globus-start-container and globus-stop-container programs. There are also helper programs (available only with the full GT installation) to start and stop the container detached from the controlling terminal (globus-start-container-detached and globus-stop-container-detached).

1.1. Deploying and undeploying services

To deploy a service into Java WS Core container use the globus-deploy-gar tool. To undeploy a service use globus-undeploy-gar.

1.2. Recommended JVM settings for the Java WS Core container

It is recommended to increase the maximum heap size of the JVM when running the container. By default on Sun JVMs a 64MB maximum heap size is used. The maximum heap size can be set using the -Xmx JVM option. Example:

$ setenv GLOBUS_OPTIONS -Xmx512M 
$ GLOBUS_LOCATION/bin/globus-start-container

The above example will make the container start with maximum heap size set to 512MB.

It is also recommended to experiment with other JVM settings to improve performance. For example, the -server option on Sun JVMs enables a server VM which can deliver better performance for server applications.

2. Deploying into Tomcat

To deploy a Java WS Core installation into Tomcat run:

$ cd $GLOBUS_LOCATION 
$ ant -f share/globus_wsrf_common/tomcat/tomcat.xml deploySecureTomcat \ 
-Dtomcat.dir=<tomcat.dir>
  

Where <tomcat.dir> is an absolute path to the Tomcat installation directory. Also, -Dwebapp.name=<name> can be specified to set the name of the web application under which the installation will be deployed. By default "wsrf" web application name is used. To enable local invocation in Tomcat you must specify -Dlocal.invocations=true

The deploySecureTomcat task will update an existing Tomcat deployment if Java WS Core was already deployed under the specified web application name. The redeploySecureTomcat task can be used instead to overwrite the existing deployment.

[Note]Note

Please note that during deployment a subset of the files from Java WS Core installation is copied into Tomcat. Also, the copied files in Tomcat might have different permissions then the originals.

In addition to the above deployment step you will also need to modify the Tomcat <tomcat_root>/conf/server.xml configuration file. In particular you will need to add the following configuration entries:

  • Tomcat 4.1.x

    1. Add a HTTPS Connector in the <Service name="Tomcat-Standalone"> section and update the parameters appropriately with your local configuration:

       <Connector className="org.apache.catalina.connector.http.HttpConnector"
                  port="8443" minProcessors="5"
                  maxProcessors="75" authenticate="true"
                  secure="true" scheme="https"
                  enableLookups="true" acceptCount="10"
                  debug="0"> 
         <Factory className="org.globus.tomcat.catalina.net.HTTPSServerSocketFactory"
                  proxy="/path/to/proxy/file"
                  cert="/path/to/certificate/file"
                  key="/path/to/private/key/file"
                  cacertdir="/path/to/ca/certificates/directory"
                  encryption="true"/> 
       </Connector>

      In the above the proxy, cert, key and cacertdir attributes are optional. Furthermore, the proxy and the combination of cert and key attributes are mutually exclusive. The encryption attribute is also optional (defaults to true if not set).

      [Important]Important

      The credentials and certificate configuration is used only by the connector and is not used by the rest of the web services stack in Globus Toolkit. To configure credentials for use in the toolkit, refer Chapter 1, Introduction.

      The mode attribute can also be set to specify the connection mode. There are two supported connection modes: ssl and gsi. The ssl mode indicates a regular SSL connection mode. The gsi mode indicates a SSL connection mode with transport-level delegation support. The ssl mode is the default mode if the mode attribute is not specified. Please note that the gsi mode is intended for advanced users only.

    2. Add a HTTPS Valve in the <Engine name="Standalone" ... > section:

      <Valve
                  className="org.globus.tomcat.catalina.valves.HTTPSValve"/>
  • Tomcat 5.0.x

    1. Add a HTTPS Connector in the <Service name="Catalina"> section and update the parameters appropriately with your local configuration:

      <Connector
                  className="org.globus.tomcat.coyote.net.HTTPSConnector"
                  port="8443" maxThreads="150"
                  minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75"
                  autoFlush="true" disableUploadTimeout="true"
                  scheme="https" enableLookups="true"
                  acceptCount="10" debug="0"
                  proxy="/path/to/proxy/file"
                  cert="/path/to/certificate/file"
                  key="/path/to/private/key/file"
                  cacertdir="/path/to/ca/certificates/directory"
                  encryption="true"/>

      In the above the proxy, cert, key and cacertdir attributes are optional. Furthermore, the proxy and the combination of cert and key attributes are mutually exclusive. The encryption attribute is also optional (defaults to true if not set).

      [Important]Important

      The credentials and certificate configuration is used only by the connector and is not used by the rest of the web services stack in Globus Toolkit. To configure credentials for use in the toolkit, refer Chapter 1, Introduction.

      The mode attribute can also be set to specify the connection mode. There are two supported connection modes: ssl and gsi. The ssl mode indicates a regular SSL connection mode. The gsi mode indicates a SSL connection mode with transport-level delegation support. The ssl mode is the default mode if the mode attribute is not specified. Please note that the gsi mode is intended for advanced users only.

    2. Add a HTTPS Valve in the <Engine name="Catalina" ... > section:

      <Valve
                  className="org.globus.tomcat.coyote.valves.HTTPSValve"/>
  • Tomcat 5.5.x:

    1. Add a HTTPS Connector in the <Service name="Catalina"> section of the Tomcat config file and update the parameters appropriately with your local configuration:

       
         <Connector
         className="org.globus.tomcat.coyote.net.HTTPSConnector"
         port="8443" maxThreads="150"
         minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75"
         autoFlush="true" disableUploadTimeout="true"
         scheme="https" enableLookups="true"
         acceptCount="10" debug="0"
         protocolHandlerClassName="org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11Protocol"
         socketFactory="org.globus.tomcat.catalina.net.BaseHTTPSServerSocketFactory"
         proxy="/path/to/proxy/file" cert="/path/to/certificate/file"
         key="/path/to/private/key/file"
         cacertdir="/path/to/ca/certificates/directory"
         encryption="true"/> 
        

      In the above the proxy, cert, key and cacertdir attributes are optional. Furthermore, the proxy and the combination of cert and key attributes are mutually exclusive. The encryption attribute is also optional (defaults to true if not set).

      [Important]Important

      The credentials and certificate configuration is used only by the connector and is not used by the rest of the web services stack in Globus Toolkit. To configure credentials for use in the toolkit, refer Chapter 1, Introduction.

      The mode attribute can also be set to specify the connection mode. There are two supported connection modes: ssl and gsi. The ssl mode indicates a regular SSL connection mode. The gsi mode indicates a SSL connection mode with transport-level delegation support. The ssl mode is the default mode if the mode attribute is not specified. Please note that the gsi mode is intended for advanced users only.

    2. Add a HTTPS Valve in the <Engine name="Catalina" ... > section of the Tomcat config file:

      <Valve
         className="org.globus.tomcat.coyote.valves.HTTPSValve55"/>

[Note]Note

It is recommend to run Tomcat with Java 1.4.2+.

2.1. web.xml configuration

You may have to edit <tomcat.dir>/webapps/wsrf/WEB-INF/web.xml if you are running Tomcat on a non-default port, that is if not using port 8443 (HTTPS). For example, if you run Tomcat on port 443 using HTTPS then the WSRF servlet entry should be modified to have the following defaultProtocol and defaultPort parameters:

<web-app> ... <servlet>
      <servlet-name>WSRFServlet</servlet-name>
      <display-name>WSRF Container Servlet</display-name>
      <servlet-class> org.globus.wsrf.container.AxisServlet
      </servlet-class> <init-param>
      <param-name>defaultProtocol</param-name>
      <param-value>https</param-value> </init-param>
      <init-param> <param-name>defaultPort</param-name>
      <param-value>443</param-value> </init-param>
      <load-on-startup>true</load-on-startup> </servlet>
      ... </web-app>

Alternatively, you can use the setDefaults Ant task to set the default protocol/port in the web.xml file:

$ cd $GLOBUS_LOCATION $ ant -f share/globus_wsrf_common/tomcat/tomcat.xml setDefaults \
        -Dtomcat.dir=<tomcat.dir> \
        -DdefaultPort=<port>
        -DdefaultProtocol=<protocol>
    

Also, by default the webContext property is set to the directory name of the web application on the file system. However, sometimes the context under which the web application is published might be different from the directory name of the application. In such cases it is necessary to explicitly configure the published context name in the web.xml file. To configure the web application context name set the webContext parameter in web.xml file. For example (assuming services are published under http://localhost:8080/foo/services) the webContext should be set to:

<web-app> ... <servlet>
      <servlet-name>WSRFServlet</servlet-name> ...
      <init-param> <param-name>webContext</param-name>
      <param-value>foo</param-value> </init-param> ...
      <load-on-startup>true</load-on-startup> </servlet>
      ... </web-app>

2.2. Debugging

2.2.1. Tomcat log files

Please always check the Tomcat log files under the <tomcat.dir>/logs directory for any errors or exceptions.

2.2.2. Enabling Log4J debugging

  • Tomcat 4.1.x

    Copy $GLOBUS_LOCATION/lib/common/commons-logging-*.jar files to <tomcat.dir>/common/lib directory. Also, copy <tomcat.dir>/webapps/wsrf/WEB-INF/classes/log4j.properties file to <tomcat.dir>/common/classes/ directory. Then configure the Log4j configuration file in <tomcat.dir>/common/classes/ directory appropriately. The debugging settings will affect all the code in all web applications.

  • Tomcat 5.0.x, 5.5.x

    Copy $GLOBUS_LOCATION/lib/common/log4j-*.jar and $GLOBUS_LOCATION/lib/common/commons-logging-*.jar files to <tomcat.dir>/webapps/wsrf/WEB-INF/lib/ directory. Then configure the Log4j configuration file in <tomcat.dir>/webapps/wsrf/WEB-INF/classes/ directory appropriately. The debugging settings will only affect the web application code.

2.3. Creating WAR file

To create a .war of a Java WS Core installation do:

$ cd $GLOBUS_LOCATION $ ant -f share/globus_wsrf_common/tomcat/tomcat.xml war
        -Dwar.file=<war.file>
    

Where <war.file> specifies the absolute path of the war file.

Please note that deploying a war file might not be enough to have a working Java WS Core deployment. For example, in some cases the xalan.jar must be placed in the endorsed directory of the container.

2.4. Deploying and undeploying services

Assuming Java WS Core is already deployed into Apache Tomcat (as described in Deploying Java WS Core), use the globus-deploy-gar tool with the -tomcat <tomcat.dir> option to deploy your GT service directly into Tomcat. Similarly, to undeploy a service, use the globus-undeploy-gar tool with the -tomcat <tomcat.dir> option to undeploy the service from Tomcat.

Alternatively, to indirectly deploy a service into Tomcat, first deploy the service into a regular GT installation using the globus-deploy-gar tool and then redeploy the GT installation into Tomcat (as described in Deploying Java WS Core). Similarly, to undeploy a service, first undeploy the service from a regular GT installation using globus-undeploy-gar tool and then redeploy the GT installation into Tomcat.

[Note]Note

Some GT services may not work properly in Tomcat.

3. Deploying into JBoss

To deploy a Java WS Core installation into JBoss (version 4.0.x+) do the following:

  1. Run:

    $ cd $GLOBUS_LOCATION $ ant -f share/globus_wsrf_common/tomcat/jboss.xml
    deployJBoss \ -Djboss.dir=<jboss.dir>
             

    Where <jboss.dir> is an absolute path to the JBoss installation directory. Also, -Dwebapp.name=<name> can be specified to set the name of the web application under which the installation will be deployed. By default "wsrf" web application name is used.

  2. Add a HTTPS Connector and HTTPS Valve:

    1. Add a HTTPS Connector in the <Service name="Catalina"> section of the Tomcat config file and update the parameters appropriately with your local configuration:

       
         <Connector
         className="org.globus.tomcat.coyote.net.HTTPSConnector"
         port="8443" maxThreads="150"
         minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75"
         autoFlush="true" disableUploadTimeout="true"
         scheme="https" enableLookups="true"
         acceptCount="10" debug="0"
         protocolHandlerClassName="org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11Protocol"
         socketFactory="org.globus.tomcat.catalina.net.BaseHTTPSServerSocketFactory"
         proxy="/path/to/proxy/file" cert="/path/to/certificate/file"
         key="/path/to/private/key/file"
         cacertdir="/path/to/ca/certificates/directory"
         encryption="true"/> 
        

      In the above the proxy, cert, key and cacertdir attributes are optional. Furthermore, the proxy and the combination of cert and key attributes are mutually exclusive. The encryption attribute is also optional (defaults to true if not set).

      [Important]Important

      The credentials and certificate configuration is used only by the connector and is not used by the rest of the web services stack in Globus Toolkit. To configure credentials for use in the toolkit, refer Chapter 1, Introduction.

      The mode attribute can also be set to specify the connection mode. There are two supported connection modes: ssl and gsi. The ssl mode indicates a regular SSL connection mode. The gsi mode indicates a SSL connection mode with transport-level delegation support. The ssl mode is the default mode if the mode attribute is not specified. Please note that the gsi mode is intended for advanced users only.

    2. Add a HTTPS Valve in the <Engine name="Catalina" ... > section of the Tomcat config file:

      <Valve
         className="org.globus.tomcat.coyote.valves.HTTPSValve55"/>

[Note]Note

JBoss 4.0.x+ installation with embedded Tomcat is required.

The Tomcat configuration file should be under <jboss.dir>/default/deploy/jbossweb-tomcat55.sar/server.xml.

Appendix E. Troubleshooting your installation

The following is a list of links that take you to information about troubleshooting your installation by component

Appendix F. Detailed Configuration by Component

The following is a list of links that take you to information about detailed configuration for each component.

Appendix G. Security Considerations in GT 4.2.1

Table of Contents

1. Common Runtime
1.1. Java WS Core
1.1.1. Permissions of service configuration files
1.1.2. Permissions of persistent data
1.1.3. Invocation of non-public service functions
1.2. C WS Core
1.2.1. Supported Protocols
1.2.2. Secure Transport
1.3. Security Considerations for Python WS Core
1.3.1. Transport Security
1.4. Security considerations for XIO
1.5. Security considerations for CoG jGlobus
1.5.1. Functions that execute an external program
1.5.2. Permissions of proxy files
1.6. Security Considerations for PyGlobus
2. Security
2.1. Security considerations for GSI C
2.2. Security considerations for Java WS A&A
2.2.1. Security considerations for authorization
2.2.1.1. Client side authorization
2.2.1.2. Host authorization
2.2.2. Security considerations for Message/Transport-level Security
2.2.2.1. File permissions
2.3. Security Considerations for CAS
2.4. Delegation Service Security Considerations
2.4.1. Key Pair Reuse
2.4.2. Authorizing Server prior to delegation
2.5. MyProxy Security Considerations
2.6. GSI-OpenSSH Security Considerations
3. Data Management
3.1. Reliable Transfer Service (RFT) Security Considerations
3.1.1. Permissions of service configuration files
3.1.2. Access of information stored in the database
3.1.3. Permissions of persistent data
3.2. Security Considerations
3.2.1. Ways to configure your server
3.2.2. New authentication option
3.2.3. Firewall requirements
3.3. Replica Location Service (RLS) Security Considerations
3.4. WS Replica Location Service (WS RLS) Security Considerations
3.5. Batch Replicator Security Considerations
3.5.1. Service configuration files
3.5.2. Delegated proxy credential files
4. Information Services
4.1. WS MDS Aggregator Services (Index Service and Trigger Service) Security Considerations
4.2. WebMDS Security Considerations
4.3. UsefulRP Security Considerations
5. Execution Management
5.1. Security Considerations

1. Common Runtime

1.1. Java WS Core

1.1.1. Permissions of service configuration files

The service configuration files such as jndi-config.xml or server-config.wsdd (located under $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/<gar>/ directory) may contain private information such as database passwords, etc. Ensure that these configuration files are only readable by the user that is running the container. The deployment process automatically sets the permissions of the jndi-config.xml and server-config.wsdd files as user readable only. However, this might not work correctly on all platforms and this does not apply to any other configuration files.

1.1.2. Permissions of persistent data

The services using subscription persistence API or other basic persistence helper API will store all or part of its persistent data under the ~/.globus/persisted directory. Ensure that the entire ~/.globus/persisted directory is only readable by the user running the container.

1.1.3. Invocation of non-public service functions

A client can potentially invoke a service function that is not formally defined in the WSDL but it is defined in the service implementation class. There are two ways to prevent this from happening:

  1. Define all service methods in your service class as either private or protected.
  2. Configure appropriate allowedMethods or allowedMethodsClass parameter in the service deployment descriptor (please see Configuring Java WS Core for details).

1.2. C WS Core

1.2.1. Supported Protocols

C WS-Core supports secure transport (https) and secure message (just X509 signing, not encryption).

1.2.2. Secure Transport

With secure transport, the entire container must be run over an https transport. This is done by default for the C container. If the user does not want security in the container, or wants to use secure message instead of secure transport, they should use the -nosec argument to globus-wsc-container.

For clients, the secure transport is enabled if the contact URI contains the 'https' scheme instead of 'http', so the client doesn't have to enable or disable it explicitly.

1.3. Security Considerations for Python WS Core

Individual services can be configured with or without message security, but transport security is a characteristic of the entire container (either using ssl or plain tcp). Authentication and authorization of clients is performed using a callback mechanism.

1.3.1. Transport Security

Simply edit the file config.txt where the executable is being run and turn on ssl.

By default, pyGridWare will look in the user's home directory for the .globus/usercert.pem and .globus/userkey.pem files.

To use the grid proxy generated by grid-proxy-init, just specify the /tmp/x509*** as the certfile and keyfile.

Example pyGridWare/bin/config.txt

[security]
ssl = 1
certfile =
keyfile = 

1.4. Security considerations for XIO

Globus XIO is a framework for creating network protocols. Several existing protocols, such as TCP, come built into the framework. XIO itself introduces no known security risks. However, all network applications expose systems to the risks inherent when outsiders can connect to them. Also included in the XIO distribution is the GSI driver, which provides a driver that allows for secure connections.

1.5. Security considerations for CoG jGlobus

1.5.1. Functions that execute an external program

Under some circumstances, the org.globus.util.Util.setFilePermissions() and the org.globus.util.ConfigUtil.getUID() functions execute an external program; thus, its behavior is influenced by environment variables such as the caller's PATH and the environment variables that control dynamic loading. Care should be used if calling these functions from a program that will be run as a Unix setuid program, or in any other manner in which the owner of the Unix process does not completely control its runtime environment.

1.5.2. Permissions of proxy files

Since Java does not provide an API for setting the permissions of a file, the Java CoG Kit will attempt to execute the /bin/chmod program in the background to set the permissions of the given file. If that program cannot be executed for any reason or fails to execute correctly, a proxy file might end up with incorrect file permissions (depending on umask setting). Usually a warning will be displayed if that occurs (especially on Windows since /bin/chmod is not supported on that platform).

1.6. Security Considerations for PyGlobus

pyGlobus has a security module which allows for proxy creation, signing, encryption, and the creation and inquiry of security contexts. Care must be taken when developing applications which use GSI to ensure that authentication information will not be compromised. When creating a security context, one must ensure that the context will have the properties that they desire. For example, should the context use confidentiality or integrity? These concerns are not specific to pyGlobus but rather to any application developer who is using low level security APIs.

2. Security

2.1. Security considerations for GSI C

  • During host authorization, the toolkit treats host names of the form "hostname-ANYTHING.edu" as equivalent to "hostname.edu". This means that if a service was setup to do host authorization and hence accept the certificate "hostname.edu", it would also accept certificates with DNs "hostname-ANYTHING.edu".

    The feature is in place to allow a multi-homed host folowing a "hostname-interface" naming convention, to have a single host certificate. For example, host "grid.test.edu" would also accept likes of "grid-1.test.edu" or "grid-foo.test.edu".

    [Note]Note

    The string ANYTHING matches only the name of the host and not domain components. This means that "hostname.edu" will not match "hostname-foo.sub.edu", but will match "host-foo.edu".

    [Note]Note

    If a host was set up to accept "hostname-1.edu", it will not accept any of "hostname-ANYTHING.edu" but will accept "hostname.edu". That is, only one of the names being compared may contain the hyphen character in the host name.

    A bug has been opened to see if this feature needs to be modfiied.

    In GT 4.2.1, it is possible to disable this behavior, by setting the enviornment variable GLOBUS_GSSAPI_NAME_COMPATIBILITY to STRICT_RFC2818.

2.2. Security considerations for Java WS A&A

2.2.1. Security considerations for authorization

2.2.1.1. Client side authorization

Client authorization of the server is done after the completion of the operation when GSI Secure Message authentication is used. If you require client authorization to be done prior, use GSI Secure Conversation or GSI Transport security.

2.2.1.2. Host authorization

During host authorization, the toolkit treats DNs "hostname-*.edu" as equivalent to "hostname.edu". This means that if a service was setup to do host authorization and hence accept the certificate "hostname.edu", it would also accept certificates with DNs "hostname-*.edu".

The feature is in place to allow a multi-homed host folowing a "hostname-interface" naming convention, to have a single host certificate. For example, host "grid.test.edu" would also accept likes of "grid-1.test.edu" or "grid-foo.test.edu".

[Note]Note

The wildcard character "*" matches only name of the hostand not domain components. This means that "hostname.edu" will not match "hostname-foo.sub.edu", but will match "host-foo.edu".

[Note]Note

If a host was set up to accept "hostname-1.edu", it will not accept any of "hostname-*.edu".

A bug has been opened to see if this feature needs to be modfiied.

2.2.2. Security considerations for Message/Transport-level Security

2.2.2.1. File permissions

The Java security code currently does not enforce secure permissions and, implicitly, file ownership requirements on any of the security related files, e.g. configuration and credential files. It is thus important that administrators ensure that the relevant files have correct permissions and ownership. Permissions should generally be as restrictive as possible, i.e. private keys should be readable only by the file owner and other files should be writable by owner only, and the files should generally be owned by the globus user (the requirements that the C code enforces are documented in Configuring GSI).

Also refer to Section 5, “Known Problems” for details on any other open issues.

2.3. Security Considerations for CAS

  • The database username/password is stored in the service configuration file and the test properties file. Ensure correct permissions to protect the information.

2.4. Delegation Service Security Considerations

2.4.1. Key Pair Reuse

The current design re-uses the keys associated with the Delegation Service for each of the proxy certificates delegated to it. During a security review, it was pointed out that while this was fine from a cryptographic standpoint, compromising this single long-lived key pair may significantly extend the time for which a single intrusion (presuming an exploitable security flaw making the intrusion possible) is effective.

This can be remedied by either frequently regenerating the key pair used by the Delegation Service, which can be accomplished with a simple cron job, or by generating a new key pair for each new delegation. The latter of these approaches requires changes to the design and may be adopted in future versions of the toolkit. For the time being, we recommend the former approach should this issue concern you.

2.4.2. Authorizing Server prior to delegation

The delegation client that is distributed with the toolkit allows for delegation of credentials even when no authorization of the server is done. Also, when using secure message authentication, the authorization of the server is done after the completion of the operation. These two scenarios could lead to the delegation of credentials to a malicious server.

To prevent this, users should use secure transport (HTTPS) or GSI Secure Conversation and appropriate client-side authorization.

2.5. MyProxy Security Considerations

You should choose a well-protected host to run the myproxy-server on. Consult with security-aware personnel at your site. You want a host that is secured to the level of a Kerberos KDC, that has limited user access, runs limited services, and is well monitored and maintained in terms of security patches.

For a typical myproxy-server installation, the host on which the myproxy-server is running must have /etc/grid-security created and a host certificate installed. In this case, the myproxy-server will run as root so it can access the host certificate and key.

2.6. GSI-OpenSSH Security Considerations

GSI-OpenSSH is a modified version of OpenSSH and includes full OpenSSH functionality. For more information on OpenSSH security, see the OpenSSH Security page.

3. Data Management

3.1. Reliable Transfer Service (RFT) Security Considerations

3.1.1. Permissions of service configuration files

The service configuration files such as jndi-config.xml and server-config.wsdd (located under etc/<gar>/ directory) contain private information such as database passwords and usernames. Ensure that these configuration files are only readable by the user that is running the container.

The deployment process automatically sets the permissions of jndi-config.xml and server-config.wsdd as user readable only. However, this might not work correctly on all platforms and this does not apply to any other configuration files.

3.1.2. Access of information stored in the database

RFT stores the transfer requests in a database. Proper security measures need to be taken to protect the access of the data by granting/revoking appropriate permissions on tables that are created for RFT use and other steps that are appropriate and consistent with site specific security measures.

3.1.3. Permissions of persistent data

RFT uses the subscription persistence API from the GT4 core to store all of its subscription data under the ~/.globus/persisted directory. Ensure that the entire ~/.globus/persisted directory is only readable by the user running the container.

3.2. Security Considerations

3.2.1. Ways to configure your server

As discussed in Section 2, “Types of configurations”, there are three ways to configure your GridFTP server: the default configuration (like any normal FTP server), separate (split) process configuration and striped configuration. The latter two provide greater levels of security as described here.

3.2.2. New authentication option

There is a new authentication option available for GridFTP in GT 4.2.1:

  • SSH Authentication Globus GridFTP now supports SSH based authentication for the control channel. In order for this to work:

    • Configure server to support SSH authentication,

      Configure client(globus-url-copy) to support SSH authentication,

      Use sshftp:// urls in globus-url-copy

    For more information, see Section 4, “SSHFTP (GridFTP-over-SSH)”.

3.2.3. Firewall requirements

If the GridFTP server is behind a firewall:

  1. Contact your network administrator to open up port 2811 (for GridFTP control channel connection) and a range of ports (for GridFTP data channel connections) for the incoming connections. If the firewall blocks the outgoing connections, open up a range of ports for outgoing connections as well.

  2. Set the environment variable GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE:

    export GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE=min,max 

    where min,max specify the port range that you have opened for the incoming connections on the firewall. This restricts the listening ports of the GridFTP server to this range. Recommended range is 1000 (e.g., 50000-51000) but it really depends on how much use you expect.

  3. If you have a firewall blocking the outgoing connections and you have opened a range of ports, set the environment variable GLOBUS_TCP_SOURCE_RANGE:

    export GLOBUS_TCP_SOURCE_RANGE=min,max 

    where min,max specify the port range that you have opened for the outgoing connections on the firewall. This restricts the outbound ports of the GridFTP server to this range. Recommended range is twice the range used for GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE, because if parallel TCP streams are used for transfers, the listening port would remain the same for each connection but the connecting port would be different for each connection.

[Note]Note

If the server is behind NAT, the --data-interface <real ip/hostname> option needs to be used on the server.

If the GridFTP client is behind a firewall:

  1. Contact your network administrator to open up a range of ports (for GridFTP data channel connections) for the incoming connections. If the firewall blocks the outgoing connections, open up a range of ports for outgoing connections as well.

  2. Set the environment variable GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE

    export GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE=min,max 

    where min,max specify the port range that you have opened for the incoming connections on the firewall. This restricts the listening ports of the GridFTP client to this range. Recommended range is 1000 (e.g., 50000-51000) but it really depends on how much use you expect.

  3. If you have a firewall blocking the outgoing connections and you have opened a range of ports, set the environment variable GLOBUS_TCP_SOURCE_RANGE:

    export GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE=min,max 

    where min,max specify the port range that you have opened for the outgoing connections on the firewall. This restricts the outbound ports of the GridFTP client to this range. Recommended range is twice the range used for GLOBUS_TCP_PORT_RANGE, because if parallel TCP streams are used for transfers, the listening port would remain the same for each connection but the connecting port would be different for each connection.

Additional information on Globus Toolkit Firewall Requirements is available here.

3.3. Replica Location Service (RLS) Security Considerations

Security recommendations include:

  • Dedicated User Account: It is recommended that users create a dedicated user account for installing and running the RLS service (e.g., globus as recommended in the general GT installation instructions). This account may be used to install and run other services from the Globus Toolkit.
  • Key and Certificate: It is recommended that users do not use their hostkey and hostcert for use by the RLS service. Create a containerkey and containercert with permissions 400 and 644 respectively and owned by the globus user. Change the rlskeyfile and rlscertfile settings in the RLS configuration file ($GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-rls-server.conf) to reflect the appropriate filenames.
  • LRC and RLI Databases: Users must ensure security of the RLS data as maintained by their chosen database management system. Appropriate precautions should be made to protect the data and access to the database. Such precautions may include creating a user account specifically for RLS usage, encrypting database users' passwords, etc.
  • RLS Configuration: It is recommended that the RLS configuration file ($GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus-rls-server.conf) be owned by and accessible only by the dedicated user account for RLS (e.g., globus account per above recommendations). The file contains the database user account and password used to access the LRC and RLI databases along with important settings which, if tampered with, could adversely affect the RLS service.

3.4. WS Replica Location Service (WS RLS) Security Considerations

Security recommendations include:

  • The following paragraph describes our INITIAL IMPLEMENTATION in this first look of the WS RLS interface -- THIS IS NOT INTENDED TO BE A FINAL SOLUTION.

    Users of the WS RLS authenticate themselves to the WS RLS in the usual manner based on their credential. The WS RLS uses the WSAA and Authorization Framework to make authorization decisions. Then, the WS RLS uses a single certificate and key file to identify itself to the RLS irregardless of the user accessing the WS RLS. Thus users that can access the WS RLS are given the fixed WS RLS identity to access the RLS. Users accustomed to using RLS may not feel comfortable with this approach -- if it may be an issue for your environment, we suggest that you not use it with your production RLS. If you think of WS RLS as the gating interface to the RLS, as you should, then you should apply the appropriate authorization restrictions at the WS RLS level, which can be done using WSAA. This will in effect achieve a level of authorization similar to that of the RLS.

3.5. Batch Replicator Security Considerations

3.5.1. Service configuration files

The service configuration files such as the JNDI configuration file,jndi-config.xml, and the Web service deployment descriptor, server-config.wsdd, located in the $GLOBUS_LOCATION/etc/globus_wsrf_replicator directory, contain sensitive information such as database username and password. It is important to ensure that these files are readable only by the system administrator that is responsible for the container. During deployment, the permissions on these files are adjusted automatically, however, you should verify the permissions to ensure that they have been correctly set for your specific platform.

3.5.2. Delegated proxy credential files

Creating a Replicator requires that the user supply a delegated credential to the Batch Replicator during the initial creation request. The service retrieves the delegated credential from the Delegation Service and stores it on the file system. As part of the Batch Replicator configuration (see installation and configuration instructions), the user selects a directory to use for storage of delegated credentials. The default setting is for the Batch Replicator to store the file in the system's designated temporary directory (e.g., /tmp on many platforms). The service sets the permissions on the temporary file such that it can only be accessed by the user account used to run the container.

4. Information Services

4.1. WS MDS Aggregator Services (Index Service and Trigger Service) Security Considerations

By default, the aggregator sources do not use authentication credentials -- they retrieve information using anonymous SSL authentication or no authentication at all, and thus retrieve only publicly-available information. If a user or administrator changes that configuration so that a service's aggregator source uses credentials to acquire non-privileged data, then that user or administrator must configure the service's aggregator sink to limit access to authorized users.

4.2. WebMDS Security Considerations

By default, the WebMDS plugins distributed as part of the Toolkit do not use authentication credentials -- they retrieve information using anonymous SSL authentication or no authentication at all, and thus retrieve only publicly-available information.

The ResourcePropertyNodeSource and ResourcePropertyQueryNodeSource plugins can be configured either to allow users to specify what resources they want to query or to only allow users to query resources pre-configured by the web administrator. The standard WebMDS deployment allows users to specify the resources they want to query; to disallow this (for example, to ensure that people don't use your site's bandwidth to view information about some other site's services), remove the files $GLOBUS_LOCATION/lib/webmds/conf/openEndedRP and $GLOBUS_LOCATION/lib/webmds/conf/openEndedQuery.

4.3. UsefulRP Security Considerations

Security recommendations for this component include:

  • FIXME list

5. Execution Management

5.1. Security Considerations

No special security considerations exist at this time.

Appendix H. Usage Statistics

The following components collect usage statistics as outlined here (along with information about how to opt-out): Usage Statistics in GT

1. Common Runtime Usage Statistics

1.1. Usage statistics sent by Java WS Core

The following usage statistics are sent by Java WS Core by default in a UDP packet (in addition to the Java WS Core component code, packet version, timestamp, and the source IP address):

  • On container startup:

    • container id - random number
    • container type - standalone, servlet, or unknown
    • event type - container startup
    • list of deployed services - service names only

  • On container shutdown:

    • container id - random number
    • container type - standalone, servlet, or unknown
    • event type - container shutdown
    • list of activated services - service names only
    • container uptime

If you wish to disable this feature, please see the "Usage Statistics Configuration" section of Section 2.4, “Usage Statistics Configuration” for instructions.

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

1.2. Usage statistics sent by C WS Core

The following usage statistics are sent by C WS Core by default in a UDP packet :

  • On container start

    • ip address of container
    • container id - random number
    • event type - container startup
    • list of deployed service names

  • On container shut down

    • ip address of container
    • container id - random number
    • event type - container shutdown
    • list of activated services

It sends it at container startup (globus-wsc-container) and receipt of that packet tells us that the container started.

If you wish to disable this feature, you can set the following environment variable before running the C container:

export GLOBUS_USAGE_OPTOUT=1

By default, these usage statistics UDP packets are sent to usage-stats.globus.org:4180 but can be redirected to another host/port or multiple host/ports with the following environment variable:

export GLOBUS_USAGE_TARGETS="myhost.mydomain:12345 myhost2.mydomain:54321"

You can also dump the usage stats packets to stderr as they are sent (although most of the content is non-ascii). Use the following environment variable for that:

export GLOBUS_USAGE_DEBUG=MESSAGES

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

2. Data Management Usage Statistics

2.1. Usage statistics sent by RFT

The following usage statistics are sent by default in a UDP packet at the end of life time of each RFT Resource (or when a RFT resource is destroyed).

  • Total number of files transferred by RFT since RFT was installed
  • Total number of bytes transferred by RFT since RFT was installed
  • Total number of files transferred in this RFT Resource
  • Total number of bytes transferred in this RFT Resource
  • Creation time of this RFT Resource
  • Factory Start Time

We have made a concerted effort to collect only data that is not too intrusive or private, and yet still provides us with information that will help improve the RFT component. Nevertheless, if you wish to disable this feature, please see the "Usage Statistics Configuration" section of Configuring Java WS Core for instructions.

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

2.2. GridFTP-specific usage statistics

The following GridFTP-specific usage statistics are sent in a UDP packet at the end of each transfer, in addition to the standard header information described in the Usage Stats section.

  • Start time of the transfer
  • End time of the transfer
  • Version string of the server
  • TCP buffer size used for the transfer
  • Block size used for the transfer
  • Total number of bytes transferred
  • Number of parallel streams used for the transfer
  • Number of stripes used for the transfer
  • Type of transfer (STOR, RETR, LIST)
  • FTP response code -- Success or failure of the transfer

[Note]Note

The client (globus-url-copy) does NOT send any data. It is the servers that send the usage statistics.

We have made a concerted effort to collect only data that is not too intrusive or private and yet still provides us with information that will help improve and gauge the usage of the GridFTP server. Nevertheless, if you wish to disable this feature for GridFTP only, use the -disable-usage-stats option of globus-gridftp-server. Note that you can disable transmission of usage statistics globally for all C components by setting "GLOBUS_USAGE_OPTOUT=1" in your environment.

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

2.3. RLS-specific usage statistics

The following usage statistics are sent by RLS Server by default in a UDP packet:

  • Component identifier
  • Usage data format identifier
  • Time stamp
  • Source IP address
  • Source hostname (to differentiate between hosts with identical private IP addresses)
  • Version number
  • Uptime
  • LRC service indicator
  • RLI service indicator
  • Number of LFNs
  • Number of PFNs
  • Number of Mappings
  • Number of RLI LFNs
  • Number of RLI LRCs
  • Number of RLI Senders
  • Number of RLI Mappings
  • Number of threads
  • Number of connections

The RLS sends the usage statistics at server startup, server shutdown, and once every 24 hours when the service is running.

If you wish to disable this feature, you can set the following environment variable before running the RLS:

export GLOBUS_USAGE_OPTOUT=1

By default, these usage statistics UDP packets are sent to usage-stats.globus.org:4180 but can be redirected to another host/port or multiple host/ports with the following environment variable:

export GLOBUS_USAGE_TARGETS="myhost.mydomain:12345 myhost2.mydomain:54321"

You can also dump the usage stats packets to stderr as they are sent (although most of the content is non-ascii). Use the following environment variable for that:

export GLOBUS_USAGE_DEBUG=MESSAGES

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

2.4. WS RLS-specific usage statistics

The WS RLS does not collect usage statistics in addition to what the RLS collects. Please consult the RLS documentation to familiarize yourself with usage statistics collected by it.

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

3. Execution Management Usage Statistics

3.1. GRAM4-specific usage statistics

The following usage statistics are sent by default in a UDP packet (in addition to the GRAM component code, packet version, timestamp, and source IP address) at the end of each job (i.e. when Done, Failed, UserTerminateDone or UserTerminateFailed state is entered).

  • job creation timestamp (helps determine the rate at which jobs are submitted)
  • scheduler type (Fork, PBS, LSF, Condor, etc...)
  • jobCredentialEndpoint present in RSL flag (to determine if server-side user proxies are being used)
  • fileStageIn present in RSL flag (to determine if the staging in of files is used)
  • fileStageOut present in RSL flag (to determine if the staging out of files is used)
  • fileCleanUp present in RSL flag (to determine if the cleaning up of files is used)
  • CleanUp-Hold requested flag (to determine if streaming is being used)
  • job type (Single, Multiple, MPI, or Condor)
  • gt2 error code if job failed (to determine common scheduler script errors users experience)
  • fault class name if job failed (to determine general classes of common faults users experience)

If you wish to disable this feature, please see the "Usage Statistics Configuration" section of Configuring Java WS Core for instructions.

Also, please see our policy statement on the collection of usage statistics.

Glossary

A

aggregator source

A Java class that implements an interface (defined as part of the Aggregator Framework) to collect XML-formatted data. WS MDS contains three aggregator sources: the query aggregator source, the subscription aggregator source, and the execution aggregator source.

C

CA Certificate

The CA's certificate. This certificate is used to verify signature on certificates issued by the CA. GSI typically stores a given CA certificate in /etc/grid-security/certificates/<hash>.0, where <hash> is the hash code of the CA identity.

client

A process that sends commands and receives responses. Note that in GridFTP, the client may or may not take part in the actual movement of data.

Condor

A job scheduler mechanism supported by GRAM. See http://www.cs.wisc.edu/condor/ for more information.

container

Also referred to as the "hosting environment." Provides a common runtime environment for web services. It manages the execution of services and resources, and manages their lifecycles. Provides security and data persistence infrasturcure, and other functionality such as managed threading and registry.

A default "standalone" container is provided with a default GT installation.

G

GAA configuration file

A file that configures the Generic Authorization and Access control GAA libraries. When using GSI, this file is typically found in /etc/grid-security/gsi-gaa.conf.

grid map file

A file containing entries mapping certificate subjects to local user names. This file can also serve as a access control list for GSI enabled services and is typically found in /etc/grid-security/grid-mapfile. For more information see the Gridmap section here.

grid security directory

The directory containing GSI configuration files such as the GSI authorization callout configuration and GAA configuration files. Typically this directory is /etc/grid-security. For more information see this.

Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI)

GSI stands for Grid Security Infrastructure and is used to describe the original infrastructure of GT security, which is comprised of SSL, PKI and proxy certificates.

GSI authorization callout configuration file

A file that configures authorization callouts to be used for mapping and authorization in GSI enabled services. When using GSI this file is typically found in /etc/grid-security/gsi-authz.conf.

H

host certificate

An EEC belonging to a host. When using GSI this certificate is typically stored in /etc/grid-security/hostcert.pem. For more information on possible host certificate locations see the GSI C Developer's Guide.

host credentials

The combination of a host certificate and its corresponding private key.

J

jndi-config.xml

It is an XML-based configuration file used to populate the container registry accessible via the JNDI API. See in the Java WS Core Developer's Guide] for details.

L

Local Replica Catalog (LRC)

Stores mappings between logical names for data items and the target names (often the physical locations) of replicas of those items. Clients query the LRC to discover replicas associated with a logical name. Also may associate attributes with logical or target names. Each LRC periodically sends information about its logical name mappings to one or more RLIs.

See also RLI.

logical file name

A unique identifier for the contents of a file.

LSF

A job scheduler mechanism supported by GRAM.

For more information, see http://www.platform.com/Products/Platform.LSF.Family/Platform.LSF/.

P

Portable Batch System (PBS)

A job scheduler mechanism supported by GRAM. For more information, see http://www.openpbs.org.

physical file name

The address or the location of a copy of a file on a storage system.

private key

The private part of a key pair. Depending on the type of certificate the key corresponds to it may typically be found in $HOME/.globus/userkey.pem (for user certificates), /etc/grid-security/hostkey.pem (for host certificates) or /etc/grid-security/<service>/<service>key.pem (for service certificates).

For more information on possible private key locations see this.

proxy certificate

A short lived certificate issued using a EEC. A proxy certificate typically has the same effective subject as the EEC that issued it and can thus be used in its place. GSI uses proxy certificates for single sign on and delegation of rights to other entities.

For more information about types of proxy certificates and their compatibility in different versions of GT, see http://dev.globus.org/wiki/Security/ProxyCertTypes.

proxy credentials

The combination of a proxy certificate and its corresponding private key. GSI typically stores proxy credentials in /tmp/x509up_u<uid> , where <uid> is the user id of the proxy owner.

R

Replica Location Index (RLI)

Collects information about the logical name mappings stored in one or more Local Replica Catalogs (LRCs) and answers queries about those mappings. Each RLI periodically receives updates from one or more LRCs that summarize their contents.

Resource Specification Language (RSL)

Term used to describe a GRAM job for GT2 and GT3. (Note: This is not the same as RLS - the Replica Location Service)

S

scheduler

Term used to describe a job scheduler mechanism to which GRAM interfaces. It is a networked system for submitting, controlling, and monitoring the workload of batch jobs in one or more computers. The jobs or tasks are scheduled for execution at a time chosen by the subsystem according to an available policy and availability of resources. Popular job schedulers include Portable Batch System (PBS), Platform LSF, and IBM LoadLeveler.

server

A process that receives commands and sends responses to those commands. Since it is a server or service, and it receives commands, it must be listening on a port somewhere to receive the commands. Both FTP and GridFTP have IANA registered ports. For FTP it is port 21, for GridFTP it is port 2811. This is normally handled via inetd or xinetd on Unix variants. However, it is also possible to implement a daemon that listens on the specified port. This is described more fully in in the Architecture section of the GridFTP Developer's Guide.

server-config.wsdd

Axis server-side WSDD configuration file. It contains information about the services, the type mappings and various handlers.

service credentials

The combination of a service certificate and its corresponding private key.

T

transport-level security

Uses transport-level security (TLS) mechanisms.

U

user credentials

The combination of a user certificate and its corresponding private key.

W

Web Services Description Language (WSDL)

WSDL is an XML document for describing Web services. Standardized binding conventions define how to use WSDL in conjunction with SOAP and other messaging substrates. WSDL interfaces can be compiled to generate proxy code that constructs messages and manages communications on behalf of the client application. The proxy automatically maps the XML message structures into native language objects that can be directly manipulated by the application. The proxy frees the developer from having to understand and manipulate XML. See the WSDL 1.1 specification for details.