Examples of the Globus Alliance's Impact

The Globus Alliance and the Globus Toolkit have enabled many exciting new scientific and business applications. The images here showcase just a few of the advances that have been helped by Globus technology.

Arterial tree, (c) 2005 The University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory

Computational scientists at Brown University are using the Globus Toolkit and MPICH-G2 to simulate the flow of blood through human arteries. This image, prepared at Argonne National Laboratory, shows velocity (red arrows) and pressure (surface color) within a branched, three-dimensional arterial structure. The simulation was conducted using Nektar (software developed at Brown University) and was the first high-performance simulation to run in a distributed fashion using systems at multiple TeraGrid sites. © 2005 The University of Chicago/Argonne National Laboratory.

Colliding Lead Ions

Globus Toolkit-driven Grid computing is central to management of large datasets generated by colliders such as those at CERN. This simulation shows two colliding lead ions just after impact, with quarks in red, blue, and green and hadrons in white. [© CERN Geneva]

SCEC Terashake

The Southern California Earthquake Center uses Globus software to visualize earthquake simulation data. Scientists simulate earthquakes by calculating the effect of shock waves as they propagate through various layers of a geological model. SCEC simulations cover a very large space with very high resolution and can generate up to 40TB of data per simulation run. This image shows earth movement from San Joaquin Valley CA, to Mexico, across the Los Angeles basin, moments after a simulated rupture. Blue and red lobes depict motion in opposite directions caused by shock waves along the fault.

Using the Access Grid

Scientists in the National Fusion Collaboratory are learning to use the Access Grid and Globus Web services to participate remotely in pulsed plasma fusion experiments. The remote interface provides sensor readings, data analysis, audio, and video available in the control room and allows the team to discuss what is happening. The Access Grid is integrated with Grid services and applications using the Globus Toolkit's security and communication libraries.

Earthquake visualization

The Southern California Earthquake Center uses Globus software to visualize earthquake simulation data. Scientists simulate earthquakes by calculating the effect of shock waves as they propagate through various layers of a geological model. This image shows the velocity of motion from a simulated earthquake through a uniform earth. The image is provided in stereo so that it can be viewed in 3D.

Hurricane Isabel, Sept. 2003

The Globus Toolkit supports scientific data visualization on the TeraGrid. This image is part of a sequence that reveals the progression of Hurricane Isabel in September 2003. A desktop application uses the Globus Toolkit to launch parallel visualization tasks on multiple TeraGrid graphics nodes. The application allows users to connect to and interact with these tasks. Data provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Gravity waves

Physicists used the Globus Toolkit and MPICH-G2 to harness the power of multiple supercomputers to simulate the gravitational effects of black hole collisions. The team, which included researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Northern Illinois University, and the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Germany, was awarded a prestigious Gordon Bell prize for its work. Image courtesy of Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics.

Earth System Grid Data

Scientists in the Earth System Grid (ESG) are producing, archiving, and providing access to climate data that advances our understanding of global climate change. This image displays data from ESG and shows sea ice extent (white/gray), sea ice motion, sea surface temperatures (colors), and atmospheric sea level pressure (contours). ESG uses Globus software for security, data movement, and system monitoring. Image provided by UCAR.